Australian Native Plants

  Melaleuca lanceolata (Dryland Tea-tree)


Melaleuca lanceolata photo
Melaleuca lanceolatas (cultivated, labelled) Maranoa Gardens, Balwyn, Victoria, Australia

Photograph by Melburnian. Some rights reserved.    (view image details)




DRYLAND TEA-TREE FACTS

distribution map showing range of Melaleuca lanceolata in Australia

Map is from The Atlas of Living Australia web site, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia License


Common Name
Dryland Tea-tree

Description
The Dryland Tea-tree is a dense shrub or small tree growing to about 8m. The bark is rough and hard. Young branchlets are hairy. The alternate leaves are linear to narrow-elliptic with pointed tips, and grow to 5mm to 15mm long and 1mm to 3mm wide. The plant produced bottlebrush-like spikes of white flowers 2cm to 4cm long, mainly in summer. The individual flowers are grouped in threes. Petals are ovate and about 2mm long. The fruit are woody capsules about 4mm to 5mm in diameter.

Height
3m - 8m

Spread
3m - 5m

Habitat
mallee, open woodland, ridges, coastal cliffs and dunes, on sandy, loam and clay soils

Propagation
seed

Wildlife Interest
attracts nectar eating birds and insect eating birds, attracts butterflies. Birds may nest in foliage.

Distribution
New South Wales, Victoria., South Australia, Western Australia.

Classification
Class:Magnoliopsida
Order:Myrtales
Family:Myrtaceae
Genus:Melaleuca
Species:lanceolata
Common Name:Dryland Tea-tree


Relatives in same Genus
  Melaleuca huegelii
  Melaleuca styphelioides
  Melaleuca trichophylla